artmastered
artmastered:

Johan Christian Dahl, Eruption of the Volcano Vesuvius, 1821, oil on canvas, 98.3 x 137.5 cm, Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen. Source
When Dahl was visiting Naples in 1821, Mount Vesuvius erupted. The artist was able to sketch the event from (very!) nearby, and he then used these drawings to create a series of oil paintings. This natural phenomenon would have greatly appealed to the Romanticists and their followers.

artmastered:

Johan Christian Dahl, Eruption of the Volcano Vesuvius, 1821, oil on canvas, 98.3 x 137.5 cm, Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen. Source

When Dahl was visiting Naples in 1821, Mount Vesuvius erupted. The artist was able to sketch the event from (very!) nearby, and he then used these drawings to create a series of oil paintings. This natural phenomenon would have greatly appealed to the Romanticists and their followers.

acknowledgetheabsurd
Don’t lies eventually lead to the truth? And don’t all my stories, true or false, tend toward the same conclusion? Don’t they all have the same meaning? So what does it matter whether they are true or false if, in both cases, they are significant of what I have been and of what I am? Sometimes it is easier to see clearly into the liar than into the man who tells the truth. Truth, like light, blinds. Falsehood, on the contrary, is a beautiful twilight that enhances every object.
Albert Camus, The Fall.
salvajes

Entre tantas preocupaciones
tan urgentes
olvidé
que también hay que
morir

irresponsable
desatendí esa obligación
o la cumplí ligeramente

desde mañana
todo cambiará

comenzaré a morir meticulosamente
sabia optimistamente
sin pérdida de tiempo.

Entre tantas ocupaciones. Tadeusz Różewicz